Tag Archives: video

AsteriskNOW – Getting started video guide

I have produced some video guides for getting started with AsteriskNOW. These are based on FreePBX 2.10.

There will be some more guides to follow including configuring IVRs, Voicemail and Call Recording.

1 – Configuring an extension

Creating an extension in FreePBX then doing a echo test call with a softphone

2 – Outbound calling

Adding a SIP call provider to the system and making an outbound test call using the extension created earlier

3 – Inbound calling

Setting up a DID/DDI number for the system and making a test call

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A2Billing video guide Part 1 – Creating a trunk

This video guide shows how to set up A2Billing for calling card and SIP use and is split in to several parts. It follows on from a FreePBX setup guide which can be found starting here – http://sysadminman.net/blog/2011/freepbx-video-guide-part-1-creating-an-extension-3395

The system used was a clean install of a SysAdminMan virtual server. You can find more details about this here – http://sysadminman.net/sysadminman-freepbx-a2billing-hosting.html

The softphone used is called Blink, this works on both Windows and Linux and you can find more details on that here – http://icanblink.com/

 

 

Trixbox, Elastix and Asterisk videos

There are some great videos around to give you an idea about what you can do with Asterisk and FreePBX.

Here are a selection –

Kerry Garrison, the senior product manager of Trixbox gives a quick tour of the installation and setup of Trixbox 2.2. The first half of this video concentrates on installing Trixbox but if you have a Trixbox VPS the hard work is done for you. Trixbox is now on version 2.4

Trixbox features. A nice run through of some of the features in FreePBX/Trixbox.

A good (and pretty long!) explanation of what you can do with Asterisk. This doesn’t include any information about FreePBX, the web based GUI.


ffmpeg and streaming video

I’ve been interested in trying to stream some of my videos from my server rather than from YouTube. YouTube is great but the video quality is pretty poor.

I’m running CentOS 5.2 and decided to just try installing ffmpeg from rpmforge rather than compiling it. Lazy but easy!

rpmforge is a repository where you can find lots of prebuilt packages that are not part of a standard Redhat/CentOS install. You can find instructions for setting it up here.

So, with rpmforge configured, this was all I needed

# yum install ffmpeg
#

Then I looked round for a player to stream the video (which were going to be in flash format). Flowplayer looked pretty nice. I just wanted something simple that would have only the video and controls on the page.

After looking over the sample html pages that come with flowplayer it was easy to create a page with just the video on there. So I uploaded my videos which were in mpg format.

Running the command

# ffmpeg -i video.mpg -s 320x288 -b1200000 -ar 44100 video.flv
#

converted the video to flash format with a pretty high quality but without making the files too large. I’m sure I could probably find better settings if I played around a bit more.

And here some examples of the end result –

http://sysadminman.net/video/takeoffsywell.html

http://sysadminman.net/video/alconbury.html

http://sysadminman.net/video/fisty_nuts.html

Just out of interest – the aircraft is a Pegasus Quantum 582 which you can see a picture of here.

I no longer own it and and miss the summer evenings flying around the english countryside.

Dell/MediaDirect wiped my data!

I’ve used Dell laptops for a while and when I was looking for a new one about a month ago I was interested in a Dell Vostro as I’d read good things. One of the good things I’d read was that you could order it without all the crapware that comes installed on most machines these days.

So I brought a Vostro 1400 and was pretty pleased with it. One of the first things I did was *wipe all the partitions* on the drive and set it up to dual boot between Windows Vista and Ubuntu – with a nice big partition to store my data. This could then be accessed from both Vista and Ubuntu – ideal.

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